Events

There’s always something exciting happening at the Museum of International Folk Art! Join us for our many programs listed below.

Museum Hill Community Day
Performance Lectures and Talks Family Demonstration

Museum Hill Community Day

September 22, 2019
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Come to Museum Hill for FREE Native dances, live music, storytelling, hands‑on activities, artist demonstrations, food, and more!

Admission and all hands-on activities are FREE for New Mexico residents and guests alike. For more info and a full schedule of events, visit MuseumHill.net/CommunityDay.

Come to Museum Hill for Native dances, live music, storytelling, hands‑on activities, artist demonstrations, food, and more! Explore family-friendly events all over the hill at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, the Museum of International Folk Art, the Museum of Spanish Colonial Art, the Santa Fe Botanical Garden, and the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian.

Admission and all hands-on activities are FREE for New Mexico residents and guests alike. For more info and a full schedule of events, visit MuseumHill.net/CommunityDay.

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Folk Art Afternoons at the Libraries
Workshop Family

Folk Art Afternoons at the Libraries

September 24, 2019
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

At Santa Fe Southside Library:

Tuesday Sept. 24th  – Tin Frames & Ornaments

Join us for free folk art family programs! Learn about folk art and cultures around the world through hands-on art making. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Please take note of the specific dates and activities. All events take place from 3:30-4:30pm.

Upcoming Programs at Southside Library:

Oct. 29th – Calaveras/ Skeleton Puppets

Nov. 26th – Animal Masks

Dec. 17th – Peruvian Retablos

Produced In Partnership with Museum of International Folk Art and Santa Fe Public Library. For more information, please contact Kemely Gomez at 505-476-1215.

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Popular Arts As National Stand-ins: Mexico's 1968 Cultural Olympiad
Lectures and Talks Featured Event

Popular Arts As National Stand-ins: Mexico's 1968 Cultural Olympiad

September 25, 2019
5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

The Museum of International Folk Art welcomes Dr. Deborah Dorotinsky of Mexico City’s Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas to discuss folk art and dipolomacy.

This lecture explores the exhibition of folk arts prepared by the Olympic Organizing Committee for the XIX Olympic Games in Mexico in 1968, and the ways popular craft was used as a form of cultural diplomacy from 1940-1970. Nearly 50 years after the original exhibition, in 2016, a group of students and curators at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) revived the exhibition, highlighting its history and the shifting definition artisanal design, craft, folk art and arte popular

Dr. Deborah Dorotinsky is a full-time tenured researcher at the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, UNAM and a professor of historiography of art history, history of Mexican ethnographic photography and gender and visual cultures 1920-1950 in the Art History Graduate Program at the same university.

Lecture with Dr. Deborah Dorotinsky: The International Exhibition of Popular Arts was one of the events that accompanied the XIX Olympic Games in Mexico 1968 as part of the Cultural Olympiad. Crafts, folk arts and arte popular were conceived by the Olympic Organizing Committee as one of the things that united all nations.  However, the games and the cultural program were obscured in Mexico by the repression of the student movement and the Tlatelolco student massacre on October 2nd, 1968. Discourse on world peace was overshadowed by repression to civil rights movements, as was happening in many other countries that year.

Mexican cultural agents had long incorporated popular arts as part of their cultural diplomacy strategies: this exhibition was one such example. In 1969, the Olympic Committee bequeathed the popular arts collection to the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) where it was stored and sporadically exhibited. In 2016 a group of curators and students of UNAM’s graduate Art History program, organized an exhibition that revised the history of the 1968 popular arts exhibition and highlighted objects from the collection to address problems of cultural diplomacy, display strategies and shifting definitions of artisanal design, craft, folk art and arte popular. This talk will address both iterations of the exhibition and propose some partial results of my ongoing research on arte popular between 1940 and 1970 in Mexico.

Prof. Deborah Dorotinsky holds a B.A. in Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley (1985) and an MA and PhD in Art History from Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM (2003). She is a full-time tenured researcher at the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, UNAM and a professor of historiography of art history, history of Mexican ethnographic photography and gender and visual cultures 1920-1950 in the Art History Graduate Program at the same university. Her book, Viaje de sombras: fotografías del Desierto de la Soledad y los indios lacandones en los años cuarenta, was published by UNAM-Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas in 2003. She coordinated, with Álvaro Vázquez, Danna Levín and Antonio Zirion, Variaciones sobre cine etnográfico: entre la documentación antropológica y la experimentación estética, 2017. She has published extensively articles and book chapters both in Spanish and English in different journals and readers.

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Docent Training Class Starts - School Tours Program
Lectures and Talks Family

Docent Training Class Starts - School Tours Program

October 1, 2019

GOT THE HEART FOR ART? Come volunteer with us now!

  • DO you love FOLK ART?
  • ENJOY Sharing with CHILDREN & ADULTS?
  • WANT TO LEARN more about ART AND CULTURE from around THE WORLD?

Join the Museum of International Folk Art’s free new SCHOOL TOURS DOCENT training class starting OCTOBER 1st,  2019

For more information about our docent program: Contact Dawn at 505-476-1207 or dawn.kaufmann @ state.nm.us

About the Museum of International Folk Art: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/

Founded in 1953 by Florence Dibell Bartlett, the Museum of International Folk Art’s mission is to foster understanding of the traditional arts to illuminate human creativity and shape a humane world. The museum holds the world’s largest international folk art collection of more than 150,000 objects from six continents and over 150 nations, representing a broad range of global artists whose artistic expressions make Santa Fe an international crossroads of culture. For many visitors, fascination with folk art begins upon seeing the whimsical toys and traditional objects within the Girard Collection. For others, the international textiles, ceramics, carvings and other cultural treasures in the Neutrogena Collection provide the allure.  The museum’s historic and contemporary Latino and Hispano folk art collections, spanning the Spanish Colonial period to modern-day New Mexico, reflect how artists respond to their time and place in ways both delightful and sobering. In 2010, the museum opened the Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience, where exhibitions encourage visitors to exchange ideas on complex issues of human rights and social justice.

 706 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe, NM 87505. (505) 476-1200.

Hours: 10 am to 5 pm daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April, closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. First Sunday of Every Month is free to NM Residents.

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CAMALACHE - Música Buena Public Opening
Performance Featured Event Family Exhibition Opening

CAMALACHE - Música Buena Public Opening

October 6, 2019
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Join us for this Free Family Friendly public exhibit opening from 1-4pm with Music, food and dances. Everyone one is encouraged to come in their fancy Fiesta dress:

  • Matachines de Bernalillo will dance outside on Museum Hill Plaza staring at 1:00 pm
  • Cipriano Vigil performs NM Folk Music from 1:00-2:30 pm
  • Lone Piñon performs NM Folk Music from 2:30 – 4:00 pm
  • Corn Husk doll making activity with Becky Dickens from 1:00 – 4:00 pm
  • Enjoy refreshments provided by the Museum of New Mexico Women’s’ Board from 2:00 – 4:00 pm
  • Big Jim Farms from Corrales, will be roasting and selling green chile
  • Herbalist and ethnobotanist, Tomás Enos owner of Santa Fe’s Milagro Herbs will demonstrate the use of local  medicinal plants and offer a variety of products for sale.

About the Museum of International Folk Art: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/

Founded in 1953 by Florence Dibell Bartlett, the Museum of International Folk Art’s mission is to foster understanding of the traditional arts to illuminate human creativity and shape a humane world. The museum holds the world’s largest international folk art collection of more than 150,000 objects from six continents and over 150 nations, representing a broad range of global artists whose artistic expressions make Santa Fe an international crossroads of culture. For many visitors, fascination with folk art begins upon seeing the whimsical toys and traditional objects within the Girard Collection. For others, the international textiles, ceramics, carvings and other cultural treasures in the Neutrogena Collection provide the allure.  The museum’s historic and contemporary Latino and Hispano folk art collections, spanning the Spanish Colonial period to modern-day New Mexico, reflect how artists respond to their time and place in ways both delightful and sobering. In 2010, the museum opened the Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience, where exhibitions encourage visitors to exchange ideas on complex issues of human rights and social justice.

 706 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe, NM 87505. (505) 476-1200.

Hours: 10 am to 5 pm daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April, closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. First Sunday of Every Month is free to NM Residents.

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Library Pop-Up Open House
Lectures and Talks

Library Pop-Up Open House

October 6, 2019
10:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Join us in the Bartlett Library & Archives for a look at "The Art of Gravestone Rubbings". Glimpse cemeteries remote in place and time through the stone rubbings from the library’s unusual collection.

Discover the Bartlett Library & Archives at the Museum of International Folk Art through our 2019 Open House  series, featuring pop-up exhibits exploring the world of folk art and the history of the Museum.  Events take place from 10 am – 2 pm.  PLEASE JOIN US FOR THESE FREE EVENTS!

About the Museum of International Folk Art: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/

Founded in 1953 by Florence Dibell Bartlett, the Museum of International Folk Art’s mission is to foster understanding of the traditional arts to illuminate human creativity and shape a humane world. The museum holds the world’s largest international folk art collection of more than 150,000 objects from six continents and over 150 nations, representing a broad range of global artists whose artistic expressions make Santa Fe an international crossroads of culture. For many visitors, fascination with folk art begins upon seeing the whimsical toys and traditional objects within the Girard Collection. For others, the international textiles, ceramics, carvings and other cultural treasures in the Neutrogena Collection provide the allure.  The museum’s historic and contemporary Latino and Hispano folk art collections, spanning the Spanish Colonial period to modern-day New Mexico, reflect how artists respond to their time and place in ways both delightful and sobering. In 2010, the museum opened the Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience, where exhibitions encourage visitors to exchange ideas on complex issues of human rights and social justice.

 706 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe, NM 87505. (505) 476-1200.

Hours: 10 am to 5 pm daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April, closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. First Sunday of Every Month is free to NM Residents.

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Girard: Culture x Design symposium
Members Friends of Indian Art (FIA) Friends of Folk Art (FOFA) Friends of Contemporary Art + Photography (FOCA+P) Friends of Archaeology (FOA) Circles Workshop Ticketed events and galas Lectures and Talks

Girard: Culture x Design symposium

October 18, 2019 through October 19, 2019

Girard: Culture x Design is a 2-day symposium about Alexander Girard, a luminary of modern design whose close engagement with traditional arts, whimsical toys, and everyday objects from around the world was a rich visual resource. Symposium speakers and moderated discussions will examine Girard through various lenses in order to create a more complex and textured understanding of his place in the history of American design as well as his approach to the collecting and exhibiting of global material culture.

The Museum of International Folk Art (MOIFA) is home to one of few remaining examples of Girard’s designed environments, the exhibition Multiple Visions: A Common Bond, which Girard created and installed in 1982 from his 106,000-object folk art collection. Here, modern design and folk art converge. By inviting contributors to explore Girard through multiple disciplines—design, art history, folklore, anthropology, and museology—this symposium offers previously unexplored perspectives on Girard and insists on a more complex interpretation of his role in both worlds.

In conjunction with the exhibition Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe, organized by Vitra Design Museum, on view at MOIFA through October 27

Symposium Participants:

Amy Auscherman  (Herman Miller)

Charlene Cerny  (Museum of International Folk Art)

Jochen Eisenbrand, PhD  (Vitra Design Museum)

Shawn Evans, AIA (Atkin Olshin Schade Architects)

Ira Jacknis, PhD  (Hearst Museum of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley)

Felicia Katz-Harris (Museum of International Folk Art)

Matthew J. Martinez, PhD  (Museum of Indian Arts and Culture)

Monica Obniski, PhD  (Milwaukee Art Museum)

Todd Oldham (Todd Oldham Studio)

Kymberly N. Pinder, PhD (MassArts)

Rachel Preston Prinz  (Archinia + Architecture for EveryBody)

Khristaan Villela, PhD  (Museum of International Folk Art)

Katherine White  (The Henry Ford)

Symposium costs are:

$225 for non-members / $200 for MNMF members

$150 for students with valid ID, and Museum of International Folk Art docents and volunteers (with special code)

Price includes 2-day symposium, continental breakfast and lunch both days, Saturday Closing Party

$100 for Saturday Closing Party only

A limited number of student scholarships are available. Contact Leslie Fagre for more information: leslie.fagre@state.nm.us.

All other questions: folkartcuratorial@gmail.com

Register online, by October 7, 2019: https://museumfoundation.org/girard-symposium/

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Noche De Animas. Tzintzuntzan, A Documentary Film about Day of The Dead

METAMORFOSIS DOCUMENTATION PROJECT PRESENTS: Noche De Animas. Tzintzuntzan,  A Documentary Film about Day of The Dead

Film Makers Armando Espinosa Prieto and Craig Johnson will preface the presentation of the documentary with a multi-media lecture on the history and current state of the rituals and celebrations of Day of the Dead.

 ADMISSION: FREE WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION; FREE TO NM SENIORS 60 & UP

As a part of their Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebration, the Museum of International Folk Art, in collaboration with Metamorfosis Documentation Project, will present the documentary film, Noche de Animas. Tzintzuntzan. The film depicts the Feast of the Faithfully Departed in the P’urhépecha community of Tzintzuntzan in Michoacán, Mexico.

Noche de Animas. Tzintzuntzan is the culmination of a collaborative project of Metamorfosis Documentation Project (represented by Armando Espinosa Prieto and Craig Johnson) and the Centro Cultural Comunitario “Tzintzuntzan” in Tzintzuntzan to document the celebration of Day of the Dead in this community and to explore the relationships between the living and their dead.

Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead) is a feast day celebrated in indigenous and mestizo communities throughout Latin America. Known as Todos Santos, Fieles Difuntos (All Souls), the celebrations have deep roots in pre-Hispanic indigenous cultures and in pagan and Catholic rituals. Each country, region and ethnicity has developed different ways of honoring their ancestors, always based on the same principles of responsibility and reciprocity that honor the role of the dead in the life of their families and communities.

The documentary investigates, as told through the voices of members of the community, how this agricultural ritual to celebrate the dead – the preparations for the celebration, the altars, and the sharing with the dead – strengthens ties of family, spiritual kinship and community.

Specifically highlighted in the film is the cultural legacy of the ancient P’urhepechas. In the celebration of Noche de Animas, family and community are regenerated in a ritual of cultural unity that features the generous sharing of abundance, evoking a feeling of belonging and well-being.

 Metamorfosis Documentation Project

Metamorfosis Documentation Project (MDP) is a local nonprofit organization based on a belief in the richness and importance of cultural traditions, focusing on cross cultural rituals and dances in the Americas.

Through projects with mestizo and indigenous communities, MDP, in collaboration with their community museums, documents and supports rituals and dances in their own cultural settings and shares them with a wider audience, fostering an understanding of distinct cultures.

These collaborative projects typically involve three phases: 1) the documenting of the tradition through filming and interviews, resulting in a documentary film, with rights to reproduction and sale of the film being gifted to the Community Museum; 2) a related project sponsored by MDP in direct support to the community; and 3) public presentation of the results of the project including documentary film screenings, submissions to film festivals, lectures, photographic exhibitions, web presentations, and related art works that offer opportunities for wider audiences to experience an inside look at cultures and community rituals markedly different from their own.

Executive Director Armando Espinosa says the mission of MDP is “to help to protect, preserve and promote traditional cultures in the Americas.”

MDP began working with indigenous communities in the late 1990’s, collaborating on a small scale project with a small Rarámuri (Tarahumara) community in Copper Canyon in Chihuahua, Mexico to document their Semana Santa (Holy Week) celebration.

Beginning in 2007, MDP has completed collaborations on four large-scale documentary project

The Day of the Dead Tzintzuntzan Project, MDP’s current project, involved a collaboration with the Centro Cultural Comunitario “Tzintzuntzan” (Tzintzuntzan Community Cultural Center) to document the traditional celebration of Noche de Animas in the P’urhépecha community of Tzintzuntzan, Michoacán.

The first phase of this Project again included MDP’s apprentice program, with two apprentices chosen by the local Tzintzuntzan Preparatory School who participated in the filming and interviewing of community members. In an additional collaboration in this phase, with support from New Mexico Film Resource, the Santa Fe Community College Film Department sent two students to work with MDP as apprentices during the filming of the actual Day of the Dead celebrations. This phase culminated in the production of the documentary, Noche de Animas. Tzintzuntzan.

In the community support portion of this Project, MDP and the Centro Cultural Comunitario “Tzintzuntzan” collaborated to offer a workshop, “Techniques of Filming and Editing Cultural Documentaries”, to nine members of the community in an effort to stimulate and prepare members of the community to document their own cultural traditions. Workshop participants filmed and produced three short documentaries focused on different cultural traditions of the community, which were then screened for the community.

MDP is now in the third phase of this Project, and is presenting Noche de Animas. Tzintzuntzan in museums and universities in Mexico and the United States.

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Day of the Dead Community Celebration
Friends of Folk Art (FOFA) Family Demonstration

Day of the Dead Community Celebration

October 27, 2019
1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Celebrate the Day of the Dead and make sugar skulls, eat traditional Day of Dead treats (pan de muertos), listen to traditional New Mexican Music,  watch Los Niños perform traditional New Mexican dances, and view the Day of the Dead ofrendas (altars).

About the Museum of International Folk Art: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/

Founded in 1953 by Florence Dibell Bartlett, the Museum of International Folk Art’s mission is to foster understanding of the traditional arts to illuminate human creativity and shape a humane world. The museum holds the world’s largest international folk art collection of more than 150,000 objects from six continents and over 150 nations, representing a broad range of global artists whose artistic expressions make Santa Fe an international crossroads of culture. For many visitors, fascination with folk art begins upon seeing the whimsical toys and traditional objects within the Girard Collection. For others, the international textiles, ceramics, carvings and other cultural treasures in the Neutrogena Collection provide the allure.  The museum’s historic and contemporary Latino and Hispano folk art collections, spanning the Spanish Colonial period to modern-day New Mexico, reflect how artists respond to their time and place in ways both delightful and sobering. In 2010, the museum opened the Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience, where exhibitions encourage visitors to exchange ideas on complex issues of human rights and social justice.

 706 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe, NM 87505. (505) 476-1200.

Hours: 10 am to 5 pm daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April, closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. First Sunday of Every Month is free to NM Residents.

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Folk Art Afternoons at the Libraries
Workshop Family

Folk Art Afternoons at the Libraries

October 29, 2019
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

At Santa Fe Southside Library:

Tuesday Oct. 29th – Calaveras/ Skeleton Puppets

Join us for free folk art family programs! Learn about folk art and cultures around the world through hands-on art making. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Please take note of the specific dates and activities. All events take place from 3:30-4:30pm.

Upcoming Programs at Southside Library:

Nov. 26th – Animal Masks

Dec. 17th – Peruvian Retablos

Produced In Partnership with Museum of International Folk Art and Santa Fe Public Library. For more information, please contact Kemely Gomez at 505-476-1215.

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Family Mornings at Folk Art
Family Featured Event Workshop

Family Mornings at Folk Art

November 3, 2019

Join us on the First FREE Sunday of the Month for our all-ages program featuring storytime, hands-on art activities and explorations in the galleries.

 FREE for all NM residents . Funded by Museum of New Mexico Foundation Education Fund

About the Museum of International Folk Art: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/

Founded in 1953 by Florence Dibell Bartlett, the Museum of International Folk Art’s mission is to foster understanding of the traditional arts to illuminate human creativity and shape a humane world. The museum holds the world’s largest international folk art collection of more than 150,000 objects from six continents and over 150 nations, representing a broad range of global artists whose artistic expressions make Santa Fe an international crossroads of culture. For many visitors, fascination with folk art begins upon seeing the whimsical toys and traditional objects within the Girard Collection. For others, the international textiles, ceramics, carvings and other cultural treasures in the Neutrogena Collection provide the allure.  The museum’s historic and contemporary Latino and Hispano folk art collections, spanning the Spanish Colonial period to modern-day New Mexico, reflect how artists respond to their time and place in ways both delightful and sobering. In 2010, the museum opened the Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience, where exhibitions encourage visitors to exchange ideas on complex issues of human rights and social justice.

 706 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe, NM 87505. (505) 476-1200.

Hours: 10 am to 5 pm daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April, closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. First Sunday of Every Month is free to NM Residents.

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Folk Art Afternoons at the Libraries
Workshop Family

Folk Art Afternoons at the Libraries

November 26, 2019
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

At Santa Fe Southside Library:

Tuesday Nov. 26th – Animal Masks

Join us for free folk art family programs! Learn about folk art and cultures around the world through hands-on art making. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Please take note of the specific dates and activities. All events take place from 3:30-4:30pm.

Upcoming at Santa Fe Southside Library:

Dec. 17th – Peruvian Retablos

Produced In Partnership with Museum of International Folk Art and Santa Fe Public Library. For more information, please contact Kemely Gomez at 505-476-1215.

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Library Pop-Up Open House
Lectures and Talks

Library Pop-Up Open House

December 1, 2019

Acquaint yourself with all manner of monsters in anticipation of MOIFA’s Yōkai: Ghosts & Demons of Japan exhibition. 

Discover the Bartlett Library & Archives at the Museum of International Folk Art through our 2019 Open House  series, featuring pop-up exhibits exploring the world of folk art and the history of the Museum.  Events take place from 10 am – 2 pm. 

About the Museum of International Folk Art: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/

Founded in 1953 by Florence Dibell Bartlett, the Museum of International Folk Art’s mission is to foster understanding of the traditional arts to illuminate human creativity and shape a humane world. The museum holds the world’s largest international folk art collection of more than 150,000 objects from six continents and over 150 nations, representing a broad range of global artists whose artistic expressions make Santa Fe an international crossroads of culture. For many visitors, fascination with folk art begins upon seeing the whimsical toys and traditional objects within the Girard Collection. For others, the international textiles, ceramics, carvings and other cultural treasures in the Neutrogena Collection provide the allure.  The museum’s historic and contemporary Latino and Hispano folk art collections, spanning the Spanish Colonial period to modern-day New Mexico, reflect how artists respond to their time and place in ways both delightful and sobering. In 2010, the museum opened the Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience, where exhibitions encourage visitors to exchange ideas on complex issues of human rights and social justice.

 706 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe, NM 87505. (505) 476-1200.

Hours: 10 am to 5 pm daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April, closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. First Sunday of Every Month is free to NM Residents.

More Info

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Yokai: Ghosts & Demons of Japan- Public Opening
Exhibition Opening Family Featured Event Performance

Yokai: Ghosts & Demons of Japan- Public Opening

December 8, 2019

Join us to for the exhibit opening of  Yokai: Ghosts & Demons of Japan, on December 8, 2019, with free family friendly events, and a ghost house from 1-4pm. Vivid in Japanese art and imagination are creatures that are at once ghastly and comical. Yokai generally refers to demons, ghosts, shapeshifters, and “strange” and supernatural beings. Specific creatures are commonly associated with classical literature, folklore, theatrical performances, festivals, art, and other forms of expressive culture. Yokai are also prevalent in contemporary Japanese popular culture; you find them in manga (comics), anime (animation), and character-based games such as Pokémon (“pocket monster”). In addition to participatory gallery crafts, the exhibition will include an immersive, family-friendly obake yashiki (a Japanese “ghost house”), a popular form of entertainment in Japanese amusement parks.

Narrative arts such as Muromachi Period scroll paintings, Edo Period woodblock prints, and contemporary folk art that depict or involve yokai will illustrate their eerie tales. Ghost and demon characters also appear in classical theatrical performances and special festival events. Contemporary Noh masks and festival costumes and the artists who make them will be a particular exhibition highlight. Toys, games, comic books, and cartoons will connect the past to the present, and the classical to the popular in terms of visual arts and culture. Learn more about the exhibit here: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibition/3810/yokai-ghosts-demons-of-japan

About the Museum of International Folk Art: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/

Founded in 1953 by Florence Dibell Bartlett, the Museum of International Folk Art’s mission is to foster understanding of the traditional arts to illuminate human creativity and shape a humane world. The museum holds the world’s largest international folk art collection of more than 150,000 objects from six continents and over 150 nations, representing a broad range of global artists whose artistic expressions make Santa Fe an international crossroads of culture. For many visitors, fascination with folk art begins upon seeing the whimsical toys and traditional objects within the Girard Collection. For others, the international textiles, ceramics, carvings and other cultural treasures in the Neutrogena Collection provide the allure.  The museum’s historic and contemporary Latino and Hispano folk art collections, spanning the Spanish Colonial period to modern-day New Mexico, reflect how artists respond to their time and place in ways both delightful and sobering. In 2010, the museum opened the Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience, where exhibitions encourage visitors to exchange ideas on complex issues of human rights and social justice.

 706 Camino Lejo, on Museum Hill in Santa Fe, NM 87505. (505) 476-1200.

Hours: 10 am to 5 pm daily, May through October; closed Mondays November through April, closed Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. First Sunday of Every Month is free to NM Residents.

More Info

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Folk Art Afternoons at the Libraries
Workshop Family

Folk Art Afternoons at the Libraries

December 17, 2019
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM

At Santa Fe Southside Library:

Tuesday Dec. 17th – Peruvian Retablos

Join us for free folk art family programs! Learn about folk art and cultures around the world through hands-on art making. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Please take note of the specific dates and activities. All events take place from 3:30-4:30pm.

Produced In Partnership with Museum of International Folk Art and Santa Fe Public Library. For more information, please contact Kemely Gomez at 505-476-1215.

+ Read More