Event Details
Gee's Bend Quilts and Beyond:

Gee's Bend Quilts and Beyond:

November 15, 2006 through May 11, 2007

Gee’s Bend Quilts and Beyond took an in-depth look at the creative vision of a master quilt-maker, Mary Lee Bendolph, and the intersecting artistic worlds in which she participated. Twelve dramatically designed, richly colored, improvisational quilts created by Mary Lee Bendolph and her family members — her mother Aolar Mosely, her daughter Essie B. Pettway, and her daughter-in-law Louisiana P. Bendolph — were presented alongside complex and evocative found object sculptures by noted African American self-taught artist Thornton Dial and visionary "yard art" artist Lonnie Holley.  This exhibit examined Bendolph’s inspiration and creative process as well as her profound connection to the cultural practices and expressive traditions from which her work arises.  Intaglio prints by Mary Lee Bendolph and her daughter-in-law Louisiana P. Bendolph,  along with documentary films about all of the artists provide further context for their creative exchange. As the deep social and aesthetic networks of these six artists intersect, they give rise to new pathways of artistic influence, resulting in a power mixture of communal and individual creative energies. The exhibition was presented by Fidelity Investments. The exhibition catalogue was sponsored by Anderson Rogers Foundation. The exhibition was co-organized by the Austin Museum of Art» and Tinwood Alliance» of Atlanta. At the Museum of International Folk Art, the exhibition and programs are made possible with generous support from the International Folk Art Foundation, the Museum of New Mexico Foundation» , and the Folk Art Committee.


Trasteros and Trunks from the Permanent Collection

Trasteros and Trunks from the Permanent Collection

January 3, 2007 through November 30, 2008
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The tradition eventually crossed the Atlantic into Mexico and New Mexico. Spanish chests were often decorated with ornate mudejar, or Christo-Mauresque, woodworking techniques as well as baroque relief carving. In New Mexico these highly decorative outside influences translated into a more "simple" folk style. Most chests and trunks were made locally in New Mexico, while others were imported from Mexico and as far away as China. Estate inventories during the 18th and 19th centuries list the chest as the most common piece of furniture in New Mexican households due to their multipurpose capabilities.


Lloyds Treasure Chest

Lloyds Treasure Chest

January 1, 2008 through October 5, 2009
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Lloyd’s Treasure Chest provided visitors with the opportunity to interact with works not on display in the upstairs galleries, providing a context for further appreciation and understanding of folk heritage, traditions, and aesthetics. Here, visitors had the opportunity to experience the behind-the-scenes museum activities and gain insight into aspects of preservation and conservation relating to the diverse works, and see videos about folk artists.


Needles + Pins:

Needles + Pins:

March 27, 2008 through February 15, 2009
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Often intricately carved or made of precious metal, sewing tools they can be seen as works of art. The finished product of each process – weaving, embroidery, sewing/needle arts, lace making, non-woven textiles, printing, and painting, was on view. The textiles displayed were coming out of storage for the first time.  Needles and Pins: Textiles and Tools took a comprehensive look at textiles and textile production from around the world.


A Chair For All Reasons

A Chair For All Reasons

June 29, 2008 through January 4, 2009
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

A Chair for all Reasons concentrated on materials and techniques in furniture craftsmanship, with the objects divided into five categories of daily life: home, work/school, kids, outdoors, and ritual.   Featuring 100 objects, A Chair for all Reasons exhibited chairs, benches, and stools from around the world. Eleven objects from Europe, three from Asia, five from Africa, five from Central America, two representing the New Mexican-Hispano tradition, and seventy from the USA (with several extraordinary “Outsider” creations).The majority of chairs are Anglo-American, from New England vernacular to contemporary studio furniture.


Nuevo Mexico: El Corazon de la Cultura
MNM 100th

Nuevo Mexico: El Corazon de la Cultura

December 24, 2008 through September 27, 2009
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Tradition, culture, soul, sprit, arte. These words have long come to symbolize the ambience of Nuevo México and the abundance of traditions that abound in our region.

Nuevo México: El Corazón de la Cultura, or New Mexico: The Heart of Culture, at the Museum of International Folk Art, includes all genres from metalsmithing, weaving, and new media to straw appliqué, tin work, recycled art and the art of the santero.  Items traded between New Mexico and Mexico and artifacts that would have come on the Manila galleons were also included. 

El Corazón de la Cultura opened Wednesday, December 24, 2008 and ran through September 27, 2009.


Dancing Shadows, Epic Tales: Wayang Kulit of Indonesia

Dancing Shadows, Epic Tales: Wayang Kulit of Indonesia

March 8, 2009 through March 14, 2010
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Dancing Shadows, Epic Tales: Wayang Kulit of Indonesia introduced the distinct form of wayang kulit found in Central Java. Various aspects of this performance art were explored, including gamelan, artistic techniques involved in making shadow puppets, the cast of characters, and regional variations of wayang. A puppet workshop, where Visitors of all ages made and played with shadow puppets was complemented by computer kiosks to learn more about Gamelan instruments and Shadow puppets.

This highly refined and complex art form may be performed to commemorate important rites-of-passage (such as circumcisions and weddings), holidays, national events (such as political elections), and personal accomplishments.

Performances are usually based on classical literature such as the Indian epics, Mahabharata and Ramayana with contemporary issues incorporated into particular scenes. In fact, the Museum of International Folk Art houses George Bush and Saddam Hussein shadow puppets. Important moral, ethical, and philosophical ideas are taught in every show, while entertaining the audience at times with roaring humor and special action-packed scenes.

The exhibit’s highlight was a 3.5 meter, double sided screen. Much like audiences in Central Java, museum visitors can watch dancing and battling shadows (on video) on one side of the screen and walk around the stage to watch (a video of) the shadow master at work from “behind the scenes.”

This award winning exhibit featured a full gamelan ensemble and the Museum’s own extraordinary collection of wayang kulit— a full set of over 200 gold and bronze-leafed Surakarta-style, court-based shadow puppets acquired from some of Java’s prominent puppeteers. The puppets flank the screen to the left and right creating the typical yet stunning arrangement that can be seen at actual performances in Central Java. Dancing Shadows, Epic Tales: Wayang Kulit of Indonesia opened March 8, 2009 and closed March 14, 2010 and is available on-line


Writing With Thread: Traditional Textiles of Southwest Chinese Minorities
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Writing With Thread: Traditional Textiles of Southwest Chinese Minorities

May 15, 2009 through August 16, 2009
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

More than 500 objects in Writing with Thread: Traditional Textiles of Southwest Chinese Minorities, represented 15 ethnic groups and nearly 100 subgroups in China.

This exhibition was curated by Angela Sheng, Assistant Professor of Chinese Art History at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada from the collection of the Evergrand Museum, Taoyuan, Taiwan. The exhibition closed in Santa Fe on August 16, 2009.


A Century of Masters:
MNM 100th

A Century of Masters:

September 27, 2009 through January 31, 2011
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

New Mexico residents are well-represented in this distinguished group of talented artists, especially given the size of the state’s population. The Museum of International Folk Art holds examples of the works of all the Fellows from New Mexico in its collections, from weavings, colcha embroidery and silversmithing, to pottery, tinwork, straw appliqué, hide painting, retablos, and woodcarving.

“The quality and range of artworks created by New Mexico’s National Heritage Fellows is impressive. The exhibit will stand as testimony to the dedication and skill of these talented artists;” said Dr. Joyce Ice, former Director of the Museum of International Folk Art.

A Century of Masters opened September 27, 2009 and closed January, 2011,  and celebrated the Museum of New Mexico’s 100th Anniversary. National Heritage Fellowship Artists from New Mexico featured in this exhibition: George López (artist, woodcarver, deceased) 1982

Margaret Tafoya (Santa Clara potter, deceased) 1984

Cleofes Vigil (storyteller, singer, deceased) 1984

Helen Cordero (Cochiti potter, deceased) 1986

Emilio & Senaida Romero (artists, tinwork and colcha embroidery, deceased) 1987

Frances Varos Graves (colcha embroiderer, deceased)1994

Ramón José López(artist, santero and silversmith) 1997 Roberto & Lorenzo Martinez (musicians) 2003 Charles M. Carrillo (artist, santero) 2006 Esther Martinez (San Juan storyteller, deceased) 2006 Eliseo & Paula Rodriguez (artists, straw appliqué) 2004 Irvin Trujillo (Rio Grande weaver) 2007. The exhibition closed January 31, 2011


Winter Holiday Celebrations from Around The World
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Winter Holiday Celebrations from Around The World

December 16, 2009 through February 28, 2010
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Lloyd’s Treasure Chest had a very special display highlighting winter celebrations.  Objects included menorahs and dreidels from Israel, nativities, cookie molds and a delightful selection of Tigers for Lunar New Year.  Lloyd’s Treasure Chest is located in the basement of the Neutrogena Wing, where visitors are invited to take a closer look at collection items, and learn about how Museums care for collections.


Material World:

Material World:

December 20, 2009 through August 7, 2011
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The exhibition was accompanied by a richly illustrated catalogue authored by exhibition curator Bobbie Sumberg. The catalog divides the textile and costume collection into two categories, textiles and dress, and into several subcategories: textiles for the bed; for the dwelling; for the church, temple, or ceremony; and, decorative pieces such as samplers. Dress is divided into headwear, outerwear, footwear, accessories, ceremonial, and complete ensembles.

Former Curator Bobbie Sumberg said, "Making and embellishing textiles can be a powerful tool of socialization and a reflection of cultural values. By looking at the production and use of textiles, numerous aspects of history and culture become illuminated. For example, gender roles within a family and within a society or culture are usually played out when cloth is made and worn.

The exhibition was in the Cotsen Gallery of the Neutrogena Wing from December 20, 2009 through August 7, 2011.


Spring & Summer Celebrations
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Spring & Summer Celebrations

April 1, 2010 through August 17, 2010
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Spring and summer celebrations from around the world in Lloyd’s Treasure Chest, an interactive space that encouraged Visitors to get closer to Museum collections.


Silver Seduction: The Art of Mexican Modernist Antonio Pineda

Silver Seduction: The Art of Mexican Modernist Antonio Pineda

June 6, 2010 through January 6, 2011
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

In the mountain town of Taxco in Mexico’s state of Guerrero, large-scale mining can be dated to the sixteenth century, and silver is a way of life. In the years following the Mexican Revolution (1910–20), jewelry and other silver objects were crafted there with an entirely innovative approach, informed by modernism and the creation of a new Mexican national identity. Antonio Pineda was a member of the Taxco School and is recognized as a world-class designer.  He lived a long and creative life, passing away at the age of 90 on December 14, 2009.

 Nearly two hundred examples of Pineda’s acclaimed silver work were displayed in Silver Seduction: The Art of Mexican Modernist Antonio Pineda, a traveling exhibition opening at the Museum of International Folk Art June 6, 2010 through January 2, 2011.

From its inception, the Taxco movement broke new ground in technical achievement and design. While American- born, Taxco-based designer William Spratling has been credited with spearheading the contemporary Taxco silver movement, it was a group of talented Mexican designers who went on to establish independent workshops and develop the distinctive “Taxco School.” Pineda, internationally renown for his silver work identified himself primarily as a taxqueño, or Taxco, silversmith. These designers incorporated numerous aesthetic orientations—Pre-Columbian art, silverwork, religious images, and other artwork from the Mexican Colonial period, and local popular arts—merging them within the broad spectrum of modernism.

Pineda himself is lauded for his bold designs and ingenious use of gemstones. Silver Seduction traced the evolution of his work from the 1930s–70s, and included more than a hundred necklaces and bracelets, as well as numerous rings, earrings, and diverse examples of his hollowware and tableware. All of the works feature Pineda’s hard-to-achieve combination of highly refined execution and hand-wrought appeal.

Pineda’s jewelry is especially known for its elegant acknowledgment of the human form. It is often said that a Pineda fits the body perfectly, that it feels right when it is worn. For example, a thick geometric necklace that might at first glance seem too weighty or rigid to wear comfortably is, in fact, faceted, hinged, or hollowed in such a way that it gracefully encircles the neck or drapes seductively down the décolletage.

 In addition, no other taxqueño jeweler used as many costly semiprecious stones or set them with as much ingenuity, skill, and variety as did Pineda. Only the most talented of silversmiths could master the unique challenges posed by setting gemstones in silver at the high temperature necessary to work the metal. Pineda, however, managed to set gems with as little metal touching them as possible, giving them a free or floating look while still holding them firmly in place. In Pineda’s hands, some stones were embedded; rows of gems were set close together to emphasize the structural lines of a design; or stones were cut to fit irregular shapes in a design. Pineda often used cultured pearls, large amethyst drops, and onyx in his designs, many examples of which are on display in the exhibition.

The remarkable creativity of this “Silver Renaissance” era represents a unique moment in the design of Mexican jewelry. Pineda’s and his colleagues’ modernist works lives on today in Taxco with a thriving industry in silver smithing.

Silver Seduction: The Art of Mexican Modernist Antonio Pineda and its publication are made possible through the generosity of the Donald B. Cordry Memorial Fund and Jill and Barry Kitnick.  The exhibition was developed by the curatorial team of the Fowler Museum with consulting curator Gobi Stromberg. All works presented are either from the collections of Cindy Tietze and Stuart Hodosh or the Fowler Museum at UCLA.  Exhibition images may be found at http://media.museumofnewmexico.org/.


Empowering Women:
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Empowering Women:

July 4, 2010 through May 8, 2011
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Inaugural exhibition opening the Gallery of Conscience, guest curated by Dr. Suzanne K. Seriff, Chair of the International Folk Art Market’s Artist Selection Committee. Dr. Marsha Bol, Director Emeritus of the Museum of International Folk Art explained the concept of the gallery of conscience "As the largest folk art museum in the world, there is a responsibility to create a forum to discuss current issues that folk artists are facing around the world. This Gallery of Conscience is devoted to the examination of issues that threaten the survival of the traditional arts, bringing them to the attention of our visitors." All of the cooperatives featured in the exhibit had artist booths at the 2010 International Folk Art Market| Santa Fe. Exhibition highlights included weaving, beadwork, painting, baskets, embroidery and other traditional folk arts from Bolivia, Rwanda, Peru, Swaziland, India, Kenya, Laos, South Africa, Morocco and Nepal.  The exhibition closed in Santa Fe May 8, 2011  and then began to travel through Guest Curator


Autumn Fiestas Feasts & Celebrations
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Autumn Fiestas Feasts & Celebrations

September 7, 2010 through November 15, 2010
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Multiple Visions: A Common Bond
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Multiple Visions: A Common Bond

January 1, 2011 through December 31, 2030
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The Girard Collection: Enduring Appeal It is entirely possible to be both delighted and overwhelmed by the Alexander Girard’s one-of-a-kind exhibition—even after more than twenty-five years. The vastness of the exhibit space, the complexity of the design, the sheer quantity of objects on display—the immensity and intensity can be overpowering. And compelling.That’s why Multiple Visions: A Common Bond has been the destination for well over a million first-time and repeat visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art. First, second, third, or countless times around, we find our gaze drawn by different objects, different scenes. With more than 10,000 objects to see, this exhibition continues to enchant museum visitors, staff and patrons.

With his singular vision and intuitive understanding of the multiplicity of cultures and artistic genres, perhaps Girard himself felt the same unflagging delight when he was designing the exhibit. Girard rewards those who look carefully with touches of wit and whimsy, amazing us with his command of detail and sense of perspective. He appeals to children and adults alike who peer into the sets from different angles, to glimpse people and animals, puppets, dolls, and small figures of clay, wood, paper, cloth, and, yes, even plastics. Some look familiar, clearly identifiable as the products of specific cultures and places. Others take us to places we can only imagine. Who can ever tire of going back to these places of enjoyment and creativity?

The Girard Family collection of more than 100,000 objects is unique in part because of its size and breadth: more than 100 countries on six continents are represented. Enjoy this text-free gallery with or without a docent, pick up a Gallery Guide to read more about the cases, or pick up a multi-media tour on an Ipod touch available at the front desk for no additional fee. 

 


Folk Art of the Andes
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Folk Art of the Andes

April 17, 2011 through March 10, 2013
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Folk Art of the Andes showcased weaving, embroidery, woodcarving, ceramics and metalwork that reflect the interweacing of indigenous folk traditions with European art forms and techniques. Highlights included costumes, jewelry, houshold objects, toys and more! The exhibit ran through September 9, 2012, in the Hispanic Heritage Wing, and through March 10, 2013 in the Bartlett Wing.  The exhibition was accompanied by a richly illustrated catalog,


The Arts of Survival: Folk Expression in the Face of Natural Disaster
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The Arts of Survival: Folk Expression in the Face of Natural Disaster

July 3, 2011 through April 29, 2012
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The Arts of Survival opened during 2011 International Folk Arts Week in Santa Fe, a community celebration that culminates with the 8th Annual International Folk Art Market | Santa Fe Highlights of the week will be artist demonstrations, artist talks, lectures, and more.

Dr. Marsha Bol, Director Emeritus of the Museum of International Folk Art described the ‘Gallery of Conscience;’ “…as a forum where current issues facing folk artists around the world can be discussed. With The Arts of Survival we continued our examination of issues threatening the survival of the traditional arts, bringing them to the attention of our visitors,” Dr, Bol continued; “As the largest folk art museum in the world we believe it is our responsibility to address issues that threaten to disrupt folk arts – and in the case of this exhibition – the effect of natural disaster on the folk art community.”

The Arts of Survival featured work by folk artists— poetry, spoken word, and photographic and video documentation to explore the many ways in which a country’s traditional arts and artists rally in times of disaster, to rebuild and renew, one day at a time. As tragic events and terrible forces become part of carnival masks, scrolls, paintings, and vodou flags, the events are memorialized and the pain they brought is brought to a manageable state. When the force of the Earth breaks the world into pieces, the pieces can be collected and sold to bring an artist a step closer to economic recovery.

Visitors to this second ‘Gallery of Conscience’ exhibit saw the devastation of the Haitian earthquake emblazoned into the carnival masks and sequined vodou flags; how a New Orleans quilter took the flood-stained bedclothes of her neighbors ruined home and made art that both restores and represents. Visitors heard the voices of the women whose centuries old tradition of ralli quilts bring comfort and color to the millions of flood refugees living in tent cities in Pakistan, and the puppeteers of Indonesia who incorporate the news of recent volcanic eruptions into their wayang performances.

 


Young Brides, Old Treasures
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Young Brides, Old Treasures

October 1, 2011 through January 6, 2013
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The exhibition Young Brides, Old Treasures: Macedonian Embroidered Dress is on line. Until the mid-twentieth century, Macedonian women wove, embroidered, and wore magnificent ensembles of dress that indicated to a knowing eye what village and region they came from and where they were in the cycle of life. From puberty through betrothal, marriage, child bearing, and old age, dress changed to reflect status change. Historic ensembles, no longer made but preserved in the museum, also illustrate the tumultuous political history of the region; pan-Slavic, Byzantine, and Ottoman influences can be seen in embroidered motifs, materials, garments, and jewelry. The outstanding collection the Museum has dates primarily from 1890 to 1920 with some later pieces from the 1950s. The exhibit featrured 27 mannequins in multi-layered ensembles as well as individual garments and pieces of jewelry belonging to Museum of International Folk Art; the Collection was made complete with a large donation from the Macedonian Arts Council» so that it is today the largest and most comprehensive museum collection in the United States. The exhibition was complemented by a catalog


New World Cuisine
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New World Cuisine

December 9, 2012 through January 5, 2014
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

New World Cuisine explored how foods around the world developed from mixing the old and the new, and how many of the tastiest dishes and desserts came to be associated with New Mexico.

The mixing of peoples and foods—the fusion of cultures and traditions referred to as mestizaje—began in August 1598. It was then that Juan de Oñate’s 500-strong expedition of soldiers, families, and Franciscan friars settled in New Mexico on the fertile and irrigated farmland of the Tewa Pueblos of Yungue and Okhay, located at the confluence of the Chama and Rio Grande Rivers.

The Old World gained new staple crops, including potatoes, sweet potatoes, maize, and cassava. Tomatoes, chili peppers, cacao, peanuts, and pineapples also were introduced, and some became culinary centerpieces in many Old World countries: the tomato in Mediterranean countries Italy, Greece, and Spain; the chili pepper in India, Korea, Thailand, and China, via the Philippines; and paprika made from chili peppers, in Hungary.

New World foods brought caloric and nutritional improvements over previously existing staples; others, like tomato and chili, complemented existing foods and traditional recipes, adding not only nourishment but also new, improved taste.

Because the New World’s vast and unpopulated fertile land was well suited for cultivating the same crops in high demand in Old World markets, the Americas became the main global supplier. Moreover, the increased supplies lowered prices for commodities such as sugar, coffee, soybeans, oranges, and bananas  making them affordable for the first time to the general population.

More than 300 objects objects from the museum’s vast collection of historical culinary items related to food harvesting, preparation, table settings, and utilitarian and decorative implements were displayed. Some examples are Asian and European spice jars retrofitted with intricately detailed locking metal lids in Mexico City to protect a household’s cacao from thieves; traditional pottery cooking vessels reimagined by metal smiths using hammered copper to accommodate the molinillo used to froth chocolate; talavera kitchen and tableware modeled after Chinese import porcelains; fine antique and contemporary silverware from Europe and the Americas. All provide insight into the importance placed on crafting exquisite food vessels and implements—and that you are what you eat with.

“It’s such a fabulous history,” curator Nicolasa Chávez said. “We borrowed a tiny pottery sherd from Chaco Canyon that was tested for theobroma (chocolate’s scientific name). I wanted that in the exhibit to really bring home to New Mexico that we’ve had a 1,000-year-old love affair with chocolate.”  The exhibition included an interactive scent station, magnetic map illuminating where foods come from, and in gallery and on social media,

   


Plain Geometry Amish Quilts
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Plain Geometry Amish Quilts

March 3, 2013 through September 2, 2013
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Quilts in the exhibit llustrated the changes in everyday life that occurred when families moved west and established communities in Ohio, Indiana, and other Midwestern states. A somber color palette gave way to brighter colors and more complex pieced patterns. The use of cotton or wool fabrics, border width, and color choice were regionally specific as well and color preferences differed according to settlement and time period.

Some quilt designs on view were Diamond in Square and Bars. These large-piece patterns are related to an even earlier form called whole cloth quilts that were not pieced but made from one-color cloth. These quilts are the most recognizably Amish with their strong contrasting colors and fine quilting. The Pennsylvania Amish continued creating these patterns long after their brethren left for lands further west.

The exhibition included crib and doll quilts. These were made by an expectant mother or grandmother to welcome a new baby into the world. Crib quilts were more frequently made in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois than in Lancaster County.

Visitors of all ages enjoyed making thier own virtual quilt on the in-gallery IPad to save and share with other visitors.


Tako Kichi: Kite Crazy in Japan
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Tako Kichi: Kite Crazy in Japan

June 9, 2013 through July 27, 2014
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Japanese Kites have been a long delightful and entertaining tradition.  The exhibition featured traditional kites from various regions of Japan, and work by respected kite artists.  This exhibition explored the cultural, historical. artistic perspectives of kite making and flying. The exhibit was complemented with a video of kite fights in Japan and in-gallery kite making.  Public programs included Artist demonstrations, with kite making and flying.


Let's Talk About This:

Let's Talk About This:

July 7, 2013 through January 5, 2014
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The Gallery of Conscience became a new kind of experimental exhibition space at the Museum of International Folk Art in 2013. Everything in the gallery is a work in progress. Come in, linger, talk, share ideas and explore important issues of conscience together, drawing on the power of folk arts to “show and tell it like it is.”

We must come to see that the end we seek is a society at peace with itself, a society that can live with its conscience.” -Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Alabama, 1965  

“You must not be ashamed to speak out, telling the community! When you keep quiet you sign your own death warrant.” Maria Rengane, embroiderer, South Africa


BRASIL & ARTE POPULAR

BRASIL & ARTE POPULAR

November 17, 2013 through January 5, 2015
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The varied cultural mix found throughout the vast region of Brazil not only draws from the original indigenous inhabitants, but also from the Portuguese colonists who began to settle there in the sixteenth century, as well as the enslaved Africans brought by the Europeans.  The majority of work in the exhibit was from the twentieth century when folk artists found that they had more freedom to portray their history, folklore, and daily life. Religious practitioners could now carry out their rituals openly and festival performers were able to draw from old traditions and use contemporary issues to create lively pageants and dramas.


Work in Progress:

Work in Progress:

March 10, 2014 through June 1, 2014
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Work in Progress: Folk Artists on Immigration -- Visitors to the Museum of International Folk Art (MOIFA) had a unique opportunity to actively participate in developing the new exhibit on the timely topic of immigration.  Work in Progress: Folk Artists on Immigration, a participatory exhibit lab explored issues of home, immigration and belonging, in the Museum’s Mark Naylor & Dale Gunn Gallery of Conscience.  The Gallery of Conscience is located in the West Gallery of the Bartlett Wing; opening in 2010 with Empowering Women: Artisan Cooperatives that Transform Communities, this space continues to engage visitors with meaningful interactive activities.

The public was invited to participate in facilitated dialogues, giving feedback and leaving their thoughts and stories in order to help shape the content and form of the exhibition. The Work in Progress space displayed handmade embroidery, carving, paintings, drawings, and beadwork about immigrant journeys made by artists from the Americas, Africa and Asia. Gallery activites included tracing your route, a world map illustrating our connections with string; along with writing and drawing activities amidst the art works by contemporary folk artists.

This exhibit lab was made possible through the support of Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn, the International Folk Art Alliance, the International Folk Art Foundation, the Museum of New Mexico Foundation’s Exhibition Development Fund, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences. Our dialogue series is part of the National Dialogues on Immigration Project of the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience. 


Wooden Menagerie: Made in New Mexico
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Wooden Menagerie: Made in New Mexico

April 6, 2014 through February 15, 2015
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

During the Work Progress Administration (WPA) period of the 1930’s, the traditional arts of the region gained resurgence through federal programmed that trained and employed New Mexican folk artists, In 1936, Patrocino Barela’s expressionistic woodcarvings created under the auspices of the Federal Arts Project were a part of New Horizons in American Art at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. The wood carving tradition continued into the 1960’s primarily for the tourist trade with classic carvings of burros and oxen drawn carts. During this time artists started experimenting with recycled materials and common household paint. The decade of the 1970’s was a dramatic period that fostered the powerful animistic forms of Felipe Archuleta and his workshop of carvers. By the 1980’s Archuleta’s animal sculptures were highly sought after by collectors and curators. His menagerie of domestic and exotic animals made their way to museum exhibits in New York, Paris and Tokyo. This exhibition celebrated the rich Hispano folk tradition of animal wood carving in New Mexico and the continued influence on the national and international scene. The exhibition highlighted the historic roots of New Mexican woodcarvers, offering early twentieth century examples of whimsical animals including works by Jose Dolores Lopez and Celso Gallegos. The excitement around the workshops of the New Mexican animal carvers created an insatiable market that spurred on innovations by Alonso Jimenez, Jim Davila, David Alvarez and Leroy Ortega. This generation of carvers fostered the iconic images of friendly burros, howling coyotes, and Technicolor rattlesnakes, reaching deep into the popular culture of the Southwestern United States. These animal sculptures have become emblematic of Santa Fe’s cultural character. The Museum of International Folk Art gratefully acknowledges the following donors for their support: The International Folk art Foundation, The Museum of New Mexico Foundation, Newman’s Own Foundation and the Museum of New Mexico Exhibitions Development Fund.


Between Two Worlds: Folk Artists Reflect on the Immigrant Experience

Between Two Worlds: Folk Artists Reflect on the Immigrant Experience

July 6, 2014 through April 3, 2016
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

An exhibition on immigration that features fiber arts, carving, paintings and works on paper about immigrant journeys and the challenges of transitioning to a new home. Traditional artists from the Americas, Africa and Asia articulate the hopes, fears, and challenges of newcomers in an unfamiliar and sometimes unwelcoming place.  This exhibit is made possible in part by an Art Works award from the National Endowment for the Arts. The Museum gratefully acknowledges the support of Mark Naylor and Dale Gunn, the International Folk Art Alliance, the International Folk Art Foundation, the Museum of New Mexico Foundation’s Director’s Leadership and Exhibitions Development Funds, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Sciences. Our dialogue series is part of the National Dialogues on Immigration Project of the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience.


Pottery of the U.S. South:

Pottery of the U.S. South:

October 24, 2014 through November 15, 2015
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Pottery of the U.S. South presented traditional stoneware from North Carolina and northern Georgia — current works characterized by earthy local clays and surprising effects of wood firing. Rooted in British and German ceramic traditions and once crucial to Southern agrarian life, Southern pottery today remains vital, a distinctive art form through which potters actively engage with their region in ways both old and new. As museum visitors explored these ways, they were invited to consider for themselves the dynamics of a living tradition.


The Red That Colored The World
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The Red That Colored The World

May 17, 2015 through September 13, 2015
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

From Antiquity to today, as symbol and hue, red has risen to the pinnacle of the color spectrum. Throughout art history, a broad red brushstroke has colored the finest art and expressions of daily life. Yet, while most people know red, few know of its source: American Cochineal, a tiny scaled insect that produces carminic acid. Fewer still know the story behind its explosive global spread after its first encounter by Spain in 16th century Mexico. Explore this fascinating story in the exhibition catalog, A Red Like No Other.Following the cochineal bug from Central American to the United States, Europe and beyond, Red displayed more than 130 objects from the Museum’s collection, private lenders and internal museums.  Each object reflected the unique uses of color and how one bug has influenced art, culture and trade throughout the world.Ths exhibition was made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: exploring the human endeavor.  Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this exhibition did not necesaarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.  Additional support came from the Museum of New Mexico Foundation, The Interantional Folk Art Foundation, The Folk Art Committee,  Newman/’s Own Foundation, and Hotel Santa Fe The Hacienda & Spa.


FLAMENCO: From Spain to New Mexico
Featured Event Family

FLAMENCO: From Spain to New Mexico

November 22, 2015 through September 10, 2017
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Known as a folkloric art form that began among the Gypsy people of southern Spain, this exhibition traces Flamenco to its arrival in the U.S. and its rise as an international art form now enjoyed by millions. The exhibition features costumes, play bills, instruments, and paintings, complemented by lectures, workshops and performances.  Tracing flamenco’s journey from fifteenth and sixteenth century Spain to twentieth century Europe’s most cultured cities will be costumes both historic and contemporary, musical instruments, costume and set design sketches, playbills, sheet music, posters, and more. These objects chronicle flamenco’s evolution from rural, folkloric tradition to elaborate staged productions incorporating extravagantly costumed dancers accompanied by virtuoso guitarists. The objects also trace flamenco’s transition to recording studios and the silver screen permitting it to gain a massive popular audience. Handed down from generation to generation, between family and community members living at society’s edges, flamenco incorporates historic dance and music traditions from Roman times to the Arabic period. Flamenco expresses a way of life shaped by a multitude of cultural and regional influences such as the Gitanos (Romany people) of Spain and Andalusian regional customs. In 2010, UNESCO declared flamenco a Masterpiece of the Intangible Heritage of Humanity. This exhibition also examines Spain’s ferias and fiestas their introduction to the southwestern US, and the individuals who contributed to making flamenco a popular art form in this country. And as the exhibition title suggests, flamenco’s integration into New Mexico’s culture will be examined.  This exhibition is the first ever to show the history and development of flamenco and its treasured role within the cultural milieu of New Mexico. The exhibition is accompanied by the book, The Spirit of Flamenco: From Spain to New Mexico, by Nicolasa Chávez (Museum of New Mexico Press, Jacketed hardbound $39.95 ISBN:978-0-89013-608-9, 192 pages, 86 color and 54 black-and-white photographs).


Sacred Realm: Blessings & Good Fortune Across Asia
Featured Event Family

Sacred Realm: Blessings & Good Fortune Across Asia

February 28, 2016 through March 19, 2017
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Almost universally, yet through varied means and belief systems, people have found ways to connect with these powers to bring stability to their lives, to divert ill-will and harm, and to attract love, fertility, prosperity, longevity, and safety ... essentially, to harness protection, blessings, and good fortune for themselves, their loved ones, and their communities. This exhibit invites visitors to explore some of the ways in which people seek and secure blessings and good fortune in Asia, a vast and culturally diverse region. Presented are amulets, votive offerings, and ritual objects – objects with other-worldly, divine qualities. These intricate and thoughtfully made works of art are drawn mostly from the museum’s Asian collection and are exhibited together with unique media and engaging interactive gallery components.

"Sacred Realm” reflects wide-ranging practices of belief that, at the same time, depict the common human desire to attain balance and harmony in the physical and spiritual realms of life.


The Morris Miniature Circus: Return of the Little Big Top
Exhibition Opening Featured Event Family

The Morris Miniature Circus: Return of the Little Big Top

April 3, 2016 through December 31, 2016
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

After 30 years, the beloved Morris Miniature Circus returns to the Museum of International Folk Art.  In 2016, the museum will restore and install the Circus once again. The Morris Circus is modeled after a 1930s “railroad circus,” back in the days when a circus would come to town by rail, set up in a day, perform for a local audience, then pack up and move on to the next venue. Morris fondly remembered the excitement that accompanied the arrival of the circus of his youth—with its steam calliope, horse-drawn circus wagons, and parade of performers and animals—and sought to preserve those memories when he began the Morris Circus in the 1930s. The Circus consists of an estimated 100,000 pieces, all made by Morris through a variety of techniques from woodcarving and painting to clay modeling and mold making. The return of the Morris Miniature Circus will be accompanied by a range of activities and public programs.


Catching Dreams Atrapando Suenos
Family

Catching Dreams Atrapando Suenos

April 10, 2016 through May 1, 2016
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Catching Dreams- Atrapando Suenos

MOIFA After School Program Second Annual Student Art exhibit. The After School Program is supported by the Ames Family Foundation, La Farge Foundation, Wells Fargo, Diane Gibbs, Nan & John Dieterich, Sara & RW Haber, Toni Fammartino, Glenn & Grace Whitecotten, Ed Stepp, Design Buiders, Susan Sugg and Carol and Dirk Novosad.


Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today's Global Market Place
Featured Event

Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today's Global Market Place

July 3, 2016 through January 8, 2018
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Visitors notice the Gallery of Conscience looks different than the rest of the museum.  In this gallery, visitors are invited behind the scenes to participate directly in the creation of an exhibition.  That is why the space looks informal and unpolished- it’s on purpose.  The Gallery of Conscience team seeks to make visitors feel welcome to write comments, leave thoughts and participate in the exhibition’s creation.

Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate is about contemporary folk artists and their relationship with their patrons, buyers and collectors. We are especially interested in understanding the pressures they might feel to keep their traditions alive in the face of modern technological advances and new consumer demands. Visitors will see a kind of "mock up" or series of idea sketches. The artworks will come at a later point in the process- after we have heard from visitors, artists and local community members. 

See six digital stories created as part of a six month master apprenticeship program in 2016, that focues on cross-generational conversation, documentation and learning of traditonal New Mexican folk arts

Iyamopo: My Life in Indigo  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93BQvlaWLoQ

Pueblo Weaving  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dre1SamDIXQ

Native Arts: Rooted in Tradition  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iffnsiFva7k

Colcha Embroidery: Stitching a Story https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2H7J6SyFI8

Unfolding Tradition  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4Lxduz1IFo

Loving Creations in Clay  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-06LO_f2emk


Lloyd's Treasure Chest
Workshop Featured Event Family

Lloyd's Treasure Chest

January 29, 2017 through January 29, 2018
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Lloyd’s Treasure Chest in the Neutrogena Wing of the Museum of International Folk Art will reopen on Sunday January 29, 2017. Visitors will take “the vehicle to the vault” to see the Folk Art treasures in sharper focus.

Folk Art is a treasure, and Lloyd’s Treasure Chest will offer a participatory gallery experience highlighting the Museum’s permanent collection of over 136,000 objects of international folk art from over 100 countries, representing thousands of unique cultures. Because the entire collection can never be on view at the same time, collections are carefully stored and cared for in rooms such as our Neutrogena Vault, which visitors can view from the Treasure Chest gallery.

Visitors are invited to think about folk art. In fact, there is no one definition of folk art. In collecting and displaying folk art, the museum considers various concepts: Folk art is traditional art, reflecting shared cultural aesthetics, community values, priorities, and social issues. Folk art may change over time and include innovations in traditions. Folk art is handmade, although it may include new, synthetic, or recycled components. Folk art may constitute income and empowerment for an individual, a family, or a community. Folk art may be art of the everyday or reserved for special occasions. Folk art may be learned formally or informally, from family or other artists. Folk art may be intangible, including various forms of expressive culture like dance, song, poetry, and food ways. Folk art is of, by, and for the people. We mean all people, inclusive of class, culture, community, ethnicity, and religion. Together, we can consider the multitude of perspectives and come closer to understanding “What is Folk Art?”

Rotating thematic displays will offer close-up views of the museum’s folk art collection. The gallery will open with “The Basket Case,” which will feature baskets and basketry items from around the world. Future rotations will include Syrian folk art and Chinese Opera. Hands on activities appropriate for ages 3 to 103 in the gallery include: coloring activities, origami, and a community basket-making activity. The cultural context of folk art can be explored with a map, book area, and baskets visitors can touch. The notion that Folk Art may be intangible is explored with a musical instrument: a gender, a gamelan instrument The re-opening brings back some old favorites from past exhibitions, including “Last of the Red Hot Lovers”, an American sculpture made from recycled metal by artist Dwight Martinek (aka “Wild Willie”), “The Followers of Ghandi” by renowned Master Folk artists Nek Chand, and a Wedding Rickshaw from Bangladesh.


No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art
Featured Event Exhibition Opening

No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art

March 12, 2017 through September 16, 2018
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art will present more than 150 examples of tramp art, concentrating on works the from the United States, with additional examples from France, Germany, Switzerland, Scandinavia, Canada, Mexico and Brazil to demonstrate the far reach this art form has had.

This is the first large-scale museum exhibition dedicated to tramp art since 1975. For many years, “tramp art” was believed to have been made by itinerants and hobos, thus its name. It has been demonstrated that this notion is largely erroneous, however the name “tramp art” has remained the only terminology used for this practice, and the paucity of scholarly studies to dispel the mistaken notions about tramp art have allowed the myths to persist. No Idle Hands will examine the assumptions related to class, quality, and the anonymity of the makers of tramp art and consider this practice instead through the lens of home and family while tracing its relationship to industry—whether as individual ethos or big industry. No Idle Hands will also include works by contemporary makers, thus establishing tramp art as an ongoing folk art form rather than a vestige of the past.


Quilts of Southwest China
Featured Event Exhibition Opening

Quilts of Southwest China

July 9, 2017 through January 21, 2018
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

In southwest China, traditional bed coverings, clothing, and household items have long been made from patched and appliqued scraps to create artistic and functional textiles. A bi-national consortium of American and Chinese museums has worked together to document and research these quilts, an art form little known outside certain ethnic minority communities. Although the making and using of these quilts have declined, a surge of renewed interest among scholars, artists, and locals is leading to growing efforts to study the textiles and the skills needed to continue making them.


Crafting Memory: Contemporary Life and Folk Art in the Andes
Exhibition Opening

Crafting Memory: Contemporary Life and Folk Art in the Andes

December 3, 2017 through March 8, 2019
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The past forty years have been a time of tremendous change in the Andes, beginning with the Agrarian Reform of 1969 that broke up the large haciendas; a twenty-year internal armed conflict with the Shining Path that engulfed the 1980’s and 1990’s and claimed nearly 70,000 lives; economic swings, rapid development, the recent large investment in preserving archaeological heritage and the current booming tourism industry. 

All of these forces have all shaped the lives of artists and informed the art they create.  Crafting Memory visits a series of contemporary folk artists in Peru and places their work within this larger framework of Peruvian history and social change. The exhibition will explore the many routes through which craft and folk arts are learned and practiced, including multigenerational crafting families, self-taught artisans, and others who came to folk arts as a means of economic survival during the time of violence.  The show includes a third generation silversmith reviving the art of tupus or shawl stick pins that were worn during the Inca Empire; the art of war orphans from the 1980’s who were trained in traditional arts to give hope in dark times; and a collective of young artists in Lima using the medium of silk screening to promote conversations between rural highland and jungle communities with their counterpart migrant neighborhoods in the city, celebrating their shared arts, culture, and customs and emphasizing the value of the handmade, and the ideas, values, and aesthetics that arise from Cultura Popular - common people and everyday life. Image courtesy of Wari Zarate, property of CHIRAPAQ, Centro de Cultureas Indigenas del Peru.


Traditional Dress in Contemporary Scandinavia
Exhibition Opening

Traditional Dress in Contemporary Scandinavia

January 10, 2021 through September 26, 2021
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Based on fieldwork with wearers and artists, including tailors, designers, shoemakers, leather workers, jewelers and silversmiths, the exhibition highlights the experiences, opinions, and creativity of individuals. Many historical and newly-made garments and accessories will be featured, illustrating the ways traditional dress and notions of the past can become tools for negotiating what it means to be Scandinavian in the 21st century